MEDICAL PERSONNEL & EMERGENCY RESPONDERS

Medical Personnel

Human trafficking is a major public health problem. Trafficked persons are likely to suffer a wide spectrum of health risks that are as a result of their unique circumstances and experiences. Research suggests a high prevalence of violence and of mental distress among victims of human trafficking, particularly with women and girls trafficked for sexual exploitation.

For victims of trafficking, health risks and consequences may begin before they are recruited into the trafficking process, continue throughout the period of exploitation and persist even after individuals are released. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The UK National Health Care System provides many opportunities for interaction with potentially trafficked victims - from acute emergency care, to long-term, and chronic care; from public health community outreach to hospitalizations.

In 2015 the results of a study published by The BMJ (British Medical Journal) showed that most NHS hospital staff were not aware of the scale of human trafficking in the UK, lacked knowledge about how to ask about experiences of human trafficking, how and when to contact law enforcement agencies, and how to make referrals to local and national support agencies.

Therefore those working in the health care profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique health care needs.

Emergency Responders

Victims of trafficking are in a vulnerable position and require support and assistance to escape their situation.

Police, ambulance and fire fighters are in a unique position to identify and protect victims of modern slavery through their daily interactions with the public. These interactions represent windows of opportunity for trafficked persons to receive assistance from frontline professionals. This is not a simple task, as victims may not present themselves as such and therefore it can be difficult to identify the signs.

Emergency responders therefore need training on how to identify the indicators of modern slavery and take appropriate action to meet the needs of victims.

How can ©Illustro Consultancy Ltd. help?

We understand that in order to find the problem, you need to know what you're looking for in the first place.

Our training courses are designed for health care providers and emergency responders to understand what modern slavery is, what it looks like, and what to do if they suspect a person is being held against their will.

Each course builds knowledge step-by-step and is tailored to the roles and needs of the trainees. We currently offer a role-specific course for health care providers and medical support staff, as well as for emergency responders. Each course is constantly updated to reflect the most up to date and relevant information based on the latest research from across the world.

Here at ©ILLUSTRO Consultancy Ltd. we believe that there is no substitute for face-to-face learning. By actively seeing a trainer convey passion about a topic, in an interactive and dynamic learning environment, the same passion is ignited in the learner.
Therefore each course is delivered in-person by our Director, Tony Dunkerley.

courses


Role of Health Care Providers in identifying and protecting victims of modern slavery

Target audience: Medical practitioners who provide direct medical treatment or assessments (General Practitioners, doctors, nurses, Health Care Assistants, maternity, mental health, paediatrics, pharmaceutical, medical students and other clinical disciplines).

Identify modern slavery in a health care setting through interactions with patients and potential human traffickers.

Role of medical support staff - Who is on your waiting room?

Target audience: Patient-facing staff (Practice Managers, Supervisors, receptionists, administration staff)

Enable support staff to spot the signs that a patient in the waiting room may be held under modern slavery.

Course Aims:

  1. Understand the definitions and concepts of modern slavery
  2. Understand the role of the health provider in identifying and protecting victims
  3. Increase knowledge of risk factors and recruitment practices of modern slavery
  4. Develop knowledge on the physical and psychological health consequences of human trafficking
  5. Identify the physical and behavioral indicators of human trafficking
  6. Understand what to do if you suspect a person is being held in modern slavery

Contact us today to see how we can help your medical personnel combat modern slavery

contact us

Emergency Responders

Target audience: Emergency services personnel (Police, ambulance and fire brigade)

Course Aims:

  1. Understand the definitions and concepts of modern slavery
  2. Understand the role of emergency responders in identifying and protecting victims
  3. Increase knowledge of risk factors and recruitment practices of modern slavery
  4. Identify the physical and behavioral indicators of human trafficking
  5. Understand what to do if you suspect a person is being held in modern slavery
  6. Understand the statutory requirements to notify the Home Office of potential victims of modern slavery

Contact us today to see how we can help your emergency responders combat modern slavery

contact us